Hiparama of the Classics by Lord Richard Buckley Read online ebook AZW, DOCX, PDF, DJV, PRC

9780872866713
English

0872866718
"I may have missed him in his time but all anyone has to do to be moved by the master of the timeless deep goof rap is drop the needle into the groove and be transported into the Lord's (Buckley) eternal word wizardry and magical riffage. If you don't have a groove to drop a needle into, you can rip those riffs right onto your pods or read them like a bible that you dig right here in this book. Do all three. Follow along, ride the hip rhythms."-- Marc Maron , comedian and host of WTF with Marc Maron Lord Buckley, His Royal Hipness, AKA the Charlie Parker of Talk, was an American performer, recording artist, and hip poet/comic who, in the 1940s and 50s, created a character that was, according to the New York Times , "An unlikely persona . . . part English royalty, part Dizzy Gillespie." Buckley's unique stage persona anticipated aspects of the Beat Generation's sensibility, and influenced figures as various as Ken Kesey, George Harrison, Tom Waits, Dizzy Gillespie, Lenny Bruce, and Robin Williams. Bob Dylan, in his book Chronicles , wrote, "Buckley was the hipster bebop preacher who defied all labels." Buckley was immensely popular, appearing multiple times on television's Tonight Show Starring Steve Allen and The Ed Sullivan Show , among others. Presenting himself as a jazz philosopher, hemp-headed hipster, and Guru of the Gone World, his speech flowed with jazz rhythms and surreal elaboration. Buckley enchanted audiences with his endlessly inventive monologues, and Hiparama of the Classics presents seven of his best-known routines, satirizing Shakespeare ("Willie the Shake"), the Marquis de Sade ("The Mark"), Mahatma Ghandi ("The Hip Ghan"), Jesus ("The Nazz"), Cabeza de Vaca ("The Gasser"), and others. First published in 1960, this new expanded edition contains, in addition to Buckley's hip-semantic raps, a new foreword by Al Young and photographs by legendary music photographers Jim Marshall, Jerry Stoll, and others. Lord Richard Buckley was born in 1906 and died in New York City in 1960. "Buckley's genius always felt as though it were coming from a real place, somewhere underground, where cats and chicks wore berets and argued about existentialism with musicians and painters who didn't know there was another eleven o'clock in the day. Instead of delivering the usual Shakespeare jive--'Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears'--Buckley would say, in his gravelly voice, 'Hipsters, flipsters, and finger-poppin' daddies: knock me your lobes.'"-- Hilton Als , The New Yorker " Hiparama of the Classics is essential to your groove. Lord Buckley lays it down and it stays down. He swings from a nebula in the far purple reaches of our galaxy. Dig him and dig infinity. His Royal Hipness still reverberates with a mad passion, poetry for the cool and cool inclined."-- Greg Proops , comedian and host of The Smartest Man in the World "If Lord Buckley was on the stand-up scene today, he'd still be the hippest cat around. He was a fully formed alternative comic when modern stand-up itself was still a baby. Reading this book, it's clear Lord Buckley is still way ahead of the curve. He's the John Coltrane of comedy before John Coltrane was the John Coltrane of John Coltrane. Dig the ditty, daddy-o?"-- W. Kamau Bell , comedian and host of The United Shades of America, Lord Buckley, His Royal Hipness, AKA the Charlie Parker of Talk, was an American performer, recording artist, and hip poet/comic who, in the 1940s and 50s, created a character that was, according to the New York Times , "An unlikely persona . . . part English royalty, part Dizzy Gillespie." Buckley's unique stage persona anticipated aspects of the Beat Generation's sensibility, and influenced figures as various as Ken Kesey, George Harrison, Tom Waits, Dizzy Gillespie, Lenny Bruce, and Robin Williams. Bob Dylan, in his book Chronicles , wrote, "Buckley was the hipster bebop preacher who defied all labels." Buckley was immensely popular, appearing multiple times on television's Tonight Show Starring Steve Allen and The Ed Sullivan Show , among others. Presenting himself as a jazz philosopher, hemp-headed hipster, and Guru of the Gone World, his speech flowed with jazz rhythms and surreal elaboration. Buckley enchanted audiences with his endlessly inventive monologues, and Hiparama of the Classics presents seven of his best-known routines, satirizing Shakespeare ("Willie the Shake"), the Marquis de Sade ("The Mark"), Mahatma Ghandi ("The Hip Ghan"), Jesus ("The Nazz"), Cabeza de Vaca ("The Gasser"), and others. First published in 1960, this new expanded edition contains, in addition to Buckley's hip-semantic raps, a new foreword by Al Young and photographs by legendary music photographers Jim Marshall, Jerry Stoll, and others. Lord Richard Buckley was born in 1906 and died in New York City in 1960. Praise for Hiparama of the Classics " Hiparama of the Classics is essential to your groove. Lord Buckley lays it down and it stays down. He swings from a nebula in the far purple reaches of our galaxy. Dig him and dig infinity. His Royal Hipness still reverberates with a mad passion, poetry for the cool and cool inclined."-- Greg Proops , comedian and host of The Smartest Man in the World "If Lord Buckley was on the stand-up scene today, he'd still be the hippest cat around. He was a fully formed alternative comic when modern stand-up itself was still a baby. Reading this book, it's clear Lord Buckley is still way ahead of the curve. He's the John Coltrane of comedy before John Coltrane was the John Coltrane of John Coltrane. Dig the ditty, daddy-o?"-- W. Kamau Bell , comedian and host of The United Shades of America "From the Lord's mouth to your eye, behold the immaculate reprint of Hiparama of the Classics ! This sacred artifact, this holy talisman brings back the words of the mythic Lord Buckley in a new ink-on-paper style edition every cool cat and kitten must drink into their soul as if nepenthe from Olympus. Though Buckley's art probably comes off better on recording than on the printed page (hit YouTube daddy-o), those with a good eye and ear for its particular and peculiar cadences can derive an excellent notion of its inner rhythms and nuances by using these pages as a script. Just take a deep breath and blow!"-- Oliver Trager , author of Dig Infinity! The Life and Art of Lord Buckley "So this unique verbal jazz riffer Buckley must've been tripping on acid while maintaining his balance across a tightrope between reverence and irreverence, spurting hipster rants and sermons like a one-Cat monarchy trapped in an animated cartoon fueled by 'the sweet rhythm of life.' Just try reading it out loud. Good Lord!"-- Paul Krassner , author of Who's to Say What's Obscene: Politics, Culture & Comedy in America


Hiparama of the Classics by Lord Richard Buckley Read online ebook DJVU, RTF, MOBI, AZW, IBOOKS

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