Read book Ensuring the Success of Latino Males in Higher Education : A New National Imperative (2016, Paperback) by in PRC, DJV, DJVU, DOCX

9781579227883
English

1579227880
"Saenz, Ponjuan, and Figueroa are leading experts on this topic. I therefore find unsurprising the brilliance evidenced in this book. Anyone who is serious about ensuring the success of Latino men in higher education will surely find much inspiration and guidance in this important text." --Shaun R. Harper, Executive Director, Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education, University of Pennsylvania"There has been substantial evidence for some time that Latino males are underrepresented in higher education. In this important new book the authors examine four critical dimensions of the problem: policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present important new research on factors that limit and promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges. For policymakers and practitioners this book will be an invaluable and insightful resource." --Pedro A. Noguera, Distinguished Professor of Education, Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, UCLA Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts. The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education relative to their peers is an important and complex one, and it lies at the heart of this book. There are several broad themes highlighted, catalogued along with the four dimensions of policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the social-cultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap, and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. This book also closely examines key practices that enable first generation Latino male undergraduates to succeed which may seem counterintuitive to institutional expectations and preconceived notions of student behavior. Using narrative data, the book also explores the role of family in persistence; outlines how Latino men conceptualize fulfilling expectations, negotiate the emasculization of the educational process, and how they confront racialization in the pursuit of a higher education; uncovers attitudes to help-seeking that are detrimental to their success: and analyzes how those who succeed and progress in college apply their social capital whether aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial, or resistant.While uncovering the lack of awareness at all levels of our colleges and universities about the depth and severity of the challenges facing Latino males, this book provides the foundation for rethinking policy; challenges leaders to institutionalize male-focused programs and services; and presents data to inform needed changes in practice for outreach and retention.", Latino males are effectively vanishing from the American higher education pipeline. Even as the number of Latinas/os attending college has actually increased steadily over the last few decades, the proportional representation of Latino males continues to slide relative to their Latina female counterparts. The question of why Latino males are losing ground in accessing higher education relative to their peers is an important and complex one, and it lies at the heart of this book. There are several broad themes highlighted, catalogued along with the four dimensions of policy, theory, research, and practice. The contributors to this book present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in both four-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the social-cultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap, and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. This book also closely examines key practices that enable first generation Latino male undergraduates to succeed which may seem counterintuitive to institutional expectations and preconceived notions of student behavior. Using narrative data, the book also explores the role of family in persistence; outlines how Latino men conceptualize fulfilling expectations, negotiate the emasculization of the educational process, and how they confront racialization in the pursuit of a higher education; uncovers attitudes to help-seeking that are detrimental to their success: and analyzes how those who succeed and progress in college apply their social capital whether aspirational, navigational, social, linguistic, familial, or resistant. While uncovering the lack of awareness at all levels of our colleges and universities about the depth and severity of the challenges facing Latino males, this book provides the foundation for rethinking policy; challenges leaders to institutionalize male-focused programs and services; and presents data to inform needed changes in practice for outreach and retention.", The contributors present new research on factors that inhibit or promote Latino success in 4-year institutions and community colleges in order to inform both policy and practice. They explore the sociocultural factors, peer dynamics, and labor force demands that may be perpetuating the growing gender gap and consider what lessons can be learned from research on the success of Latinas. Book jacket.


Ensuring the Success of Latino Males in Higher Education : A New National Imperative (2016, Paperback) Read book AZW3, DJVU, TXT

It accompanies a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition, at the Grunes Gewolbe, Dresden, March May 2012; at the Frick Collection, New York, May August; at the Galerie J.Teach Like a Champion, journalist Elizabeth Green compared two schools of thought'one that teaching skills were the most important driver of classroom learning, the other that content knowledge was the true driver.