Read book Earn All You Can : Getting Rich for Good by Donald House in PRC, DJV, IBOOKS

9781501808401
English

1501808400
Discover a fresh take on the positive role of economic growth from a Christian perspective that corrects the conventional wisdom of cultured despisers disparaging wealth and financial success. Is the gap between rich and poor really the fault of the financially successful? Much of the modern Christian and secular conversation around wealth contends that a widening gap separating the rich and the poor is both a reflection of an unfair economic system and a failure of Christians to sufficiently assist "the least of these." This book introduces important economic principles contained in the works of several Nobel Prize winning economists in conversation with foundational Christian ideas about wealth and success rooted in Jewish teaching, Roman Catholic literature, and the sermons of Methodist founder, John Wesley. Economic theory, Jewish oral traditions, important papal letters of Pope Pius IX and John Paul II, and the sermons of John Wesley provide a context for understanding frequently cited scripture passages on wealth and poverty. The conclusion? The rising gap between the rich and the poor, particularly since the Industrial Revolution, is a reflection of economic growth that has lifted more out of poverty than any other process known to humanity. Moreover, the most significant charitable programs in the early history of America largely followed key basic economic and Christian principles. Societal shifts during the Great Depression and the Cultural Revolution in the 1960s have led to a growing disparagement and demonizing of the rich. Counter to their best intentions, these shifts have actually hindered progress in lifting people out of poverty. Worse, these cultural assessments of wealth are not consistent with Christian teaching on wealth and poverty. Contents include: 1. Disdain for the Rich and the Contributions of the Wealthy 2. Economics and the Science of Success 3. Torah and the Jewish Roots of Christian Ideas on Wealth and Poverty 4. Jesus, Paul, and the Economics of Faithfulness 5. Catholic Teaching and the Imago Dei: Fruitful work as creatio continua 6. Wesley, Wealth, and the Ethics of Work 7. The Rich and Poor in Scripture 8. The Christian Roots of Charity in America 9. The American Dream: Hard Work, Success, and the Integrity of Wealth, Is the gap between rich and poor really the fault of the financially successful? Much of the modern Christian and secular conversation around wealth contends that a widening gap separating the rich and the poor is both a reflection of an unfair economic system and a failure of Christians to sufficiently assist "the least of these." Earn All You Can introduces important economic principles contained in the works of several Nobel Prize winning economists in conversation with foundational Christian ideas about wealth and success rooted in Jewish teaching, Roman Catholic literature, and the sermons of Methodist founder, John Wesley. Economic theory, Jewish oral traditions, important papal letters of Pope Pius IX and John Paul II, and the sermons of John Wesley provide a context for understanding frequently cited scripture passages on wealth and poverty. The conclusion? The rising gap between the rich and the poor, particularly since the Industrial Revolution, is a reflection of economic growth that has lifted more out of poverty than any other process known to humanity. Moreover, the most significant charitable programs in the early history of America largely followed key basic economic and Christian principles.


Earn All You Can : Getting Rich for Good Read ebook AZW3, IBOOKS, DJVU

You'll see how the question of prosperity is framed by the four natural elements and discover the basics of magick.You will learn about Ferguson's secrets on people-management, changing mind-sets, visualisation, building confidence and embracing change - all techniques at the heart of turning Manchester United into a winning machine.Having emigrated with her family from Mexico to the United States when she was six years old, Dulce battled depression and low self-esteem as a teenager and eventually enlisted in the army in an attempt to turn her life around.